Frequently Asked Questions

 
Training for Engineers


1. When was the book launched and where?

The book was launched on September 16, 2013; the venue was the auditorium of the Nigerian Communications Satellite Ltd. on the Airport Rd, Lugbe, Abuja. Go back...

2. Who attended the launch?

The launch was attended by former and current senior members of government ministries and agencies, past and current university teaching, research and administrative staff and governing boards, leaders in the private sectors using high technology tools for production and services for the public, senior administrators in public sector organizations, and concerned citizens vested in seeing STI contribute to Nigeria’s development. Go back...

 

3. When were Nigeria’s satellites launched? 

Nigeria’s first earth observation satellite, NigeriaSat-1 was launched on September 27, 2003; NigeriaSat-2 and NigeriaSat-X were launched on August 2, 2011. The NigComSat (communications) satellites were launched on May 13, 2007 (NigComSat-1) and December 19, 2011 (NigComSat1-R). Go back...

        

4. Where were the Nigcomsat satellites launched? 

NigComSat (communications) satellites were launched in Russia and China. NigeriaSat (earth observation) satellites were launched in Russia. Go back...

 

5. How are the NigeriaSat earth observation satellites being used?

The satellites are producing images being used by Nigeria’s planning and environment related agencies for monitoring land use and ecosystem change and for planning climate change mitigation strategies, for example. Many other countries access NigeriaSat images for disaster monitoring through the disaster monitoring constellation (DMC) of which Nigeria is a member. Nigeria Sat-I has been highly patronized by the government of the USA; indeed some of the best images of the Katrina disaster in Louisiana were taken by NigeriaSat-1.Go back...

      

6. How are the NigComSat communications satellites being used?

The large payloads of transponders carried by NigComSat satellites are patronized by government and private companies who lease transponders or contract broadband services for use in security systems, direct to home television, by the media, and for navigation among others. Go back...

 

7. What are the main applications of biotechnology which were emphasized during the period under review?

Biotechnology applications in the agriculture sector focused mainly on selection of elite indigenous strains of animals (grass cutters, snails, doun etc.) and cultivars of plants (cassava, pineapple, plantain etc.); sophisticated gene banks for preservation of strains of known and unknown value are maintained by NACGRAB and others; centres were established to distribute strains and cultivars and provide training (BioDec’s under NABDA for example). Medical pharmaceuticals based on indigenous bioresources and  disease testing kits development were supported, as were chemical and industrial  biotechnology research and applications of local resources. With respect to potential use of genetically modified organisms (GMO’s), emphasis was placed on establishing robust biotechnology policies and guidelines for prevention of genetic resources mis-management. Go back...

       

8. What forms of energy are being developed to offset the emphasis on oil and gas in Nigeria?

Renewable energy sources such as wind and solar were supported through the Energy Commission; research and development of bio fuels and biodiesel from indigenous plants were supported (e.g. Jatropha and Neems) through NARICT,  ECN and RMRDC. NOTAP set up a PV panel manufacture programme. A roadmap for the generation of energy from nuclear sources in Nigeria was drafted by the Nigerian Atomic Energy Commission. Go back...

       

9. What are the most important concerns with respect to climate change in Nigeria?

Nigeria contributes significantly to global green-house gas production through gas flaring and emissions from vehicles, generators and factories. The country is also impacted (desertification, flooding and erosion, ecosystem modifications etc.) by the causes of climate change elsewhere around the world. The Ministry of Science and Technology, therefore is concerned with policy making and integrated applications of high technology to monitoring, prevention and management of the results of climate change. Go back ...

 10. Why is the management of intellectual property rights and proprietary knowledge emphasized?

Under Isoun’s direction, there was concerted effort to ensure that contracts for adopting and applying high technology in development, included the purchase of international property rights – to prevent being held hostage indefinitely to owners of such technologies. Approaches included getting government to be willing to pay, building capacity through contracted training and reverse engineering. Efforts are being made to prevent intellectual property with respect to biodiversity being acquired by other countries without permits and for Nigeria to register this property for its own use and for sale to others. Go back...

 11. What was done to ensure capacity in STI is enlarged in Nigeria?

Nigeria has over 250 space engineers and scientists – with the first group trained in the UK and China and subsequent groups trained in Nigeria, USA and Russia.   Hi-tech biotech labs are providing training in Nigeria with funds from the Bill Gates Foundation. Renewable energies (solar and wind) programmes included training spearheaded by the Energy Commission of Nigeria. NITDA has strong capacity building activities and has provided ICT scholarships for in-house, local university and international training. Most of the Ministry’s agencies provide capacity building for young Nigerians through Industrial training (IT) attachments.   For example, industrial training attachments in NOTAP have built capacity in computer aided design (CAD), and manufacture, and virtual manufacture of new and spare parts. Nigerian physicists and engineers have been sent abroad for advanced training in nuclear science in readiness for nuclear power plant construction. Go back...